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Is a 44 inch chest big for bodybuilding?

Discover how big a 44 inch chest really is for a man who lifts weights regularly.
Written By  James Jackson
Last Updated on 6th June 2022
A bodybuilder showing his 44 inch chest

It’s not just your pectoral muscle mass that affects your chest size; the size of your back and rib cage also contribute a lot of mass toward your circumference measurement.

Knowing this, is it fair to say that a 44 inch chest is a good size?

It also depends on your build and body fat, so let’s tackle each factor in turn to see how impressive a 44” chest really is for a man.

In addition to checking out our other circumference guides, you can click the link to learn how to measure your chest circumference so that you have an accurate measurement to work with.

Is a 44 inch chest big for bodybuilding?

A bodybuilder measuring his big 44 inch chest

Is a 44 inch chest big for bodybuilding? Yes, a 44 inch chest is pretty big for a natural bodybuilder who lifts weights on a regular basis. Most men who go to the gym don’t have a 44” chest, so if you have a muscular 44 in chest, then that’s very good indeed.

Of course, a 44 inch chest circumference consists of more than just pectoral muscle mass. For example, you could have a 44” chest due to having a really wide back and a large ribcage but relatively underdeveloped chest muscles.

So, in this scenario, when people see your actual chest development, they might not necessarily believe that you have a 44 in chest. However, since you have a wide back and a big ribcage, the measurement is obviously believable once you explain that pectoral size isn’t the only contributor to a chest circumference measurement.

Similarly, if you’re a shorter lifter, then your 44 inch chest is going to look bulkier than that of a taller lifter. The simple reason for this is that your chest mass is essentially condensed over a much smaller surface area, which makes it protrude out further and appear less stretched out.

What size is a 44 inch chest?

A man with a 44 inch chest size getting measured

In most cases, a 44 inch chest works out at a size large in men’s clothing. Note that 44 inches is typically on the upper end of a size large, so you might want to size up to an XL if you’d like a more comfortable fit (or if you expect your chest to grow).

How should a 44" chest fit in with the rest of your physique?

A man with a 44 inch chest size

Having a 44 inch chest is all well and good. But for your 44” chest to look its best, it needs to fit in with the rest of your physique from an aesthetic standpoint.

So, if you have decent arms and a 44 in chest, that’s good. Your physique will definitely look aesthetic and proportional.

On the other hand, if you have skinny arms but have somehow sculpted a fairly big 44 inch chest, then your upper body will likely look way out of proportion.

Now, if you have a 44” chest due to having a big ribcage, then it’s conceivable that you could have a 44” circumference measurement while having skinny arms because, in this scenario, it’s your bone structure rather than your muscle mass that’s giving you the pretty decent chest measurement.

I’d say that having arms between 16 and 17 inches is ideal if you have a 44 inch chest. If you want to appear more limb dominant, then you’d want your arms to be more developed (relatively speaking) in relation to your chest.

Conversely, if you want your chest development to be the main focal point of your upper body, then you’d likely want your pecs to be better developed than your bis and tris. It just depends on the kind of physique that you’re training for (and sometimes your genetics will naturally determine whether you’re more limb-dominant or torso-dominant).

Can naturals exceed a 44 in chest?

A man showing his big 44 inch chest

I’ll be honest: Not every natural lifter can expand their chest beyond 44 inches while staying lean. For example, if you’re short and have a narrow ribcage, then it seems somewhat unlikely that you’ll develop a lean 44” chest.

Of course, gaining excess body fat in order to get a 44 in chest is very different from building pectoral and upper back muscle mass over time.

For this reason, I advise that you don’t fixate on a specific circumference measurement, such as getting 44 inch pecs. Instead, focus on building the best physique you can. Chances are, you’ll have a pretty decent circumference measurement if you train consistently.

Now, there are certainly some lifters—those who are tall and have a big ribcage—who can get a 44 inch chest without trying. Indeed, some larger-framed lifters might have a 44” chest before they even pick up a weight.

While we might dream of having a big frame (big frames give you more space to hang your muscle mass), you can have a really well-developed chest without having a huge measurement. This is why I always recommend focusing on your training and letting the circumference gains take care of themselves.

In conclusion: How good is a 44 inch chest for bodybuilding?

A man getting his 44 in chest measured

For natural bodybuilding, a 44 inch chest is pretty good, especially if your body fat level is relatively low (you don’t need to be ripped, though). What you should be more concerned about, however, is the actual development of your chest and back muscles, which, along with your ribcage, are two of the main contributors to your chest size.

After all, physiques aren’t judged based on circumference measurements; they’re usually assessed based on the development of your muscles. So build your pecs and back, and just watch your measurements go up!

James Jackson
James Jackson is a personal trainer who uses his expertise in strength and conditioning to create helpful workout tutorials that show fitness enthusiasts how to build muscle while staying safe in the gym. He draws on the latest sports science data as well as tried and tested training techniques to get the best results for his clients without them having to live in the gym.
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