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If you want to find out the average wrist size for men, women, and teenagers, then you're in the right place. 

We poured through pages and pages of wrist measurement data—surveys, polls, scientific reports, anthropometric research—so that we could give you the most accurate information on the average wrist circumference and how that relates to your age, height, and frame size.

Later on, we'll also show you how to find your wrist size using a variety of measuring tools, which will be useful if you want to buy a new watch, a bracelet, or if you want to determine your body frame size.

Related Measurement Guides:

What is the average wrist size for a woman?

A female measuring her wrist to see if she has an average wrist size for a woman

What is the average wrist size for a woman? According to MedlinePlus, which is a service from the National Library of Medicine, the average women's wrist size is between 5.5 inches and 6.5 inches (13.97 cm to 16.51 cm). [1]

As noted in the article, the average female wrist size tends to increase with height, seeing as taller people usually have larger bones than shorter people.

The above data is perfectly supported by a 1995 anthropometric survey of US military personnel, which, among other things, measured the wrist circumference of 2888 women. The researchers found that the average woman's wrist size was 5.94 inches, which is equal to 15.08 cm, or around 151 mm. [2]

What is the average male wrist size?

A man getting his wrist measured to see if he has an average male wrist size

What is the average wrist size for a man? According to US anthropometric data taken from Marine Corps personnel, the average male wrist size is 6.85 inches (17.39 cm). 

The average male wrist size in mm is right around 174 mm (millimeters), according to the report, which measured the wrist circumference of 4447 men.

Once again, this data tallies nicely with more recent research. Indeed, based on anthropometric data published by the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Systems Center in 2017, the average male wrist circumference was found to be 172 mm, which is equal to 17.2 cm or 6.77 inches. [3]

A 2018 poll of 175 men on the Time Factors watch forum found that the average male wrist size in inches was 6.75 inches. [4] This again corresponds with the US data cited above, indicating that most men have wrists that measure just under 7 inches in circumference.

Compare Your Wrist Circumference:

What is the average wrist circumference for a teenage girl?

A wrist measurement chart showing the average wrist size for teenage girls and female children

As you would expect, the average wrist circumference for a teenage girl is heavily dependent on the age of the girl, with older girls tending to have thicker wrists than younger girls.

The following data, which is broken down by age, is taken from the Census at School, which is run by the Statistical Society of Canada. [5] I believe the following measurements to be fairly representative of teenagers in general, and the data certainly has validity in other Western countries.  

The average wrist measurement for a 13-year-old girl is 5.97 inches (15.17 cm).

The average wrist size by age in inches for a 14-year-old girl is exactly 6 inches, which is equal to 15.25 cm.

A normal wrist size for a 15-year-old girl was found to be 6.03 inches or 15.32 cm. This was the same for 16-year-old girls.

A normal wrist circumference for a 17-year-old girl was found to be 6.09 inches or 15.49 cm.

Finally, for 18-year-old girls, the average wrist measurement is right around 5.97 inches or 15.18 cm.

As you can see on the wrist measurement chart, the wrists of teenage girls tend to stop getting thicker at around age 14, which is towards the end of a girl's pubertal period.

What is the average wrist circumference for a teenage boy?

A wrist circumference chart showing the average wrist measurement for teenage boys and male children

As you can see on the above ​​wrist circumference chart, the average wrist circumference for a teenage boy tends to increase with age and doesn't level off at age 14 like it does with girls.

Once again, this data is taken from a Canadian Census at School report, which has proven to be very reliable. Indeed, you'll find very similar measurements in other anthropometric data sets, including the referenced wrist circumference measurements for Turkish children and adolescents. [6]

With that said, here is the average wrist size by age in cm and inches for male teenagers.

The average wrist girth measurement for a 13-year-old boy is 16.10 cm or 6.33 inches.

For a 14-year-old boy, the average wrist size measurement is 16.38 cm or 6.44 inches.

For a 15-year-old boy, the typical wrist size is right around 16.54 cm or 6.51 inches.

The typical wrist circumference for a 16-year-old boy is 16.94 cm or 6.66 inches.

The average wrist circumference measurement for a 17-year-old boy is 17.39 cm or 6.84 inches.

Finally, the standard wrist size for a male 18-year-old is 16.92 cm or 6.66 inches.

What is the average wrist width and diameter?

A wrist sizes chart showing the average wrist width measurement for males and females of various ages

What is the average wrist width? According to US anthropometric data taken from the CDC's Vital and Health Statistics report, the average wrist width is 5.9 cm (2.28 inches) for men and 5.2 cm (2.04 inches) for women. [7]

This data is based on the wrist breadth measurements (also commonly called wrist span and wrist diameter) of 7,501 men and 8,162 women aged 20 and older.

What's interesting is that the average wrist diameter for both men and women tends to increase slightly with age. For example, women aged 20-29 have an average wrist diameter of 5 cm, whereas women aged 80+ have an average wrist width of 5.4 cm, almost an 8% size difference.

Women's wrist size chart

A women's wrist size chart showing various wrist sizes for females

This women's wrist size chart is based on wrist girth measured with a tape and will help you to figure out whether your wrists are small, medium, or large in terms of circumference.

Note that these measurements are for women of a relatively normal height. If you're significantly shorter or taller than average, then your wrists might be a different size, which could be perfectly normal for your frame size.

Men's wrist size chart

A men's wrist size chart showing various male wrist circumference measurements

This men's wrist size chart was created using data from a variety of sources, including published anthropometric research and expert health authorities.

This wrist sizing chart will help men like you to figure out whether they have small, medium, large, or extra large wrists, which, in turn, will give you an insight into your frame size. More on that later.

How to measure your wrist size (5 ways)

If you want to learn how to measure your wrist size for a new watch, a bracelet, or just to determine your wrist circumference, then you're in the right place.

This section will show you how to figure out your wrist size using a variety of wrist measurement tools. So no matter what measuring equipment you have at your disposal, you'll easily—and accurately—be able to determine the circumference of your wrists.

How to measure your wrist circumference with a tape measure

A man demonstrating how to measure your wrist size and circumference with a tape measure

First and foremost, let me explain how to measure your wrist circumference with a tape measure, as this is the most convenient way to determine your wrist size.

  1. Wrap a flexible tape measure around your wrist just below the bone.
  2. Open your hand so that your fingers are separated.
  3. Observe where the ends of the tape overlap; that's your wrist circumference measurement.
  4. Take another 1-2 wrist measurements to verify your circumference.

How to measure your wrist size without a tape measure

A man showing how to measure your wrist size without a tape measure

Now you're going to learn how to measure your wrist size without a tape measure—and there are multiple ways to do it.

My favorite way to measure your wrist circumference without a tape measure is to use a piece of string. Why? Because, like a tape measure, the string is flexible and wraps snugly around your wrist, which gives you a really precise measurement.

Essentially, you wrap the string around your wrist, and then, using a pen, you simply mark where the ends overlap. Then, to get your wrist girth measurement, you just measure between these two points.

The second way to measure your wrist without a tape measure is with a simple piece of paper. All you do is cut (or tear) a thin strip from a regular sheet of paper so that it can fit around your wrist like a tape measure.

Then, you just wrap the paper around your wrist and mark where the ends overlap. Finally, you measure between these two points using a ruler or tape measure to determine your wrist circumference.

How to measure your wrist with your fingers (wrist girth test)

A man demonstrating how to measure your wrist with your fingers

Although measuring your wrist with your fingers won't give you a wrist measurement in inches, cm, or mm, it will help you to determine how big your wrists are, which, in turn, will tell you something about your frame size.

First, place your wrist out in front of you and open your fingers (your wrist will be slightly bigger when your fingers are spaced apart). Then, wrap the thumb and forefinger of your opposite hand around your wrist.

If your thumb and finger overlap, then you have a small frame. If they touch but don't really overlap, then you have a medium frame. Finally, if there's a gap between your thumb and forefinger, then you have a large frame.

You'll learn more about the relationship between your wrist circumference and your frame size later on. But essentially, while the size of your wrist is one way to quickly gauge your frame size, there's a lot more that goes into determining your frame size and muscular potential than just the girth of your wrists.

How to measure your wrist width

A man taking a wrist width measurement with a tape measure

Measuring your wrist width or wrist diameter is important when you're buying a new watch. As such, you definitely want to use a proper tape measure so that you can get a watch that fits you properly.

To measure your wrist width, look at your hand when it's in a palm-down position and locate the two bony parts on the outside of your wrist. Then, measure between these two bones (i.e., the width of the outside/top of your wrist) to get your wrist diameter.

Selecting a good wrist measurement tool

Three wrist measurement tools

While it's possible to measure your wrist circumference with a piece of string or even a sheet of paper, by far the most convenient and accurate way to determine your wrist size is to measure your wrists with a proper tape measure.

In this regard, you have two choices; a flexible tape measure used for taking general body measurements or a smaller tape specifically used for measuring the wrist.

The latter option is more convenient because, by using a small tape measure, you don't have to deal with such a long and unwieldy wrist measurement tool, which will help you to keep the tape close to your wrist and get an accurate circumference measurement. 

When you use a dedicated wrist measurement tool, your wrist circumference will likely be a tiny bit smaller than when you measure your wrists with a general body tape measure because you’ll be able to keep the wrist measurement tool closer to your skin.

Wrist measurement FAQ

Learn everything there is to know about ​​wrist measurements with this helpful FAQ and ​​wrist size guide.

What is the average male wrist size by height?

Two men demonstrating the average male wrist size by height

Although there is no data that specifically examines the average male wrist size by height, we know from both scientific research and observation that wrist circumference and frame size both tend to increase with height.

Indeed, one study found that wrist girth correlated with height and weight in children and adolescents, which suggests that people with larger skeletal frames in general tend to have bigger wrists as well. [8]

Much of this research focuses on children so that practitioners and public health workers can assess the growth of children to see if they're developing at the normal rate.

Still, the same very likely holds true for adults. After all, a man who’s 5′6″ is almost always going to have significantly smaller wrists than a man who’s 6′6″.

What is the average female wrist size by height?

A woman demonstrating the average female wrist size by height

Again, there is no scientific data that directly examines the average female wrist size by height. However, as I noted earlier, the average female wrist size, which is around 6 inches, tends to increase with height.

There are, of course, short women with big wrists and tall women with small wrists. Still, the generalization holds true most of the time because a bigger frame means bigger joints which, for our purposes, means bigger wrists as well.

This claim is supported by research that examined the wrist width of 123 women. The authors of the study found that wrist width (a good indicator of wrist size) correlated with age, body size, and lean mass. [9] So, in general, women with bigger wrists tend to have more body mass and larger skeletal structures. 

In summary, there's no chart that I can create or source that will show you average wrist size by height for males and females because the data simply doesn't exist. But such novel research would certainly be useful for anyone interested in anthropometry.

What is the average wrist size by age?

A man and a woman demonstrating the average wrist size by age

What is the average wrist size by age? In the section on teenage wrist size, I explained that wrist circumference tends to increase with age during puberty. This occurs until around age 14 for girls and age 18 to 19 for boys.

Additionally, other previously cited anthropometric research that examined the wrist breadth of adults found that wrist width also tends to increase with age. [7] For example, 80 years olds had wider wrists than 20-year-olds and 30-year-olds.

In general, circumference measurements tend to decrease with age due to sarcopenia. But the fact that the wrists appear to grow larger with age suggests that the wrists may keep growing after puberty.

So while I couldn't find a specific wrist size chart by age in terms of circumference, there is certainly a trend for wrist size to increase well into adulthood and old age when assessed by width.

What is the average wrist size in the UK?

A British man and woman measuring their wrists to see if they have an average wrist size for UK residents

What is the average wrist size in the UK? Based on data that contains the wrist circumference measurements of various Western populations, the average wrist size in the UK is 6.5 inches to 7 inches for men and 5.5 inches to 6 inches for women.

Specific UK data concerning the average wrist circumference in males and females is hard to come by. However, most people would agree that Brits have similar anthropometric measurements to Americans in terms of their bone structure, so the measurements cited throughout this article will almost certainly apply to people living in the UK.

How does your wrist size affect your body frame?

A man measuring another man's wrist circumference to determine his frame size

There is a strong relationship between wrist size and body frame. Those with larger wrists tend to have a bigger frame overall, which is to say, longer bones and more skeletal mass.

Although people with big wrists usually have thick joints in general, frame size can also be determined on a per joint basis. For example, you could theoretically have really long clavicles but fairly average wrists.

The opposite of this is also true; you could have narrow shoulders and big wrists.

In general, however, people with big frames overall tend to have large wrists, which often means that taller individuals have bigger wrists than shorter individuals.

What is a small wrist size?

A woman showing that she has a small wrist circumference measurement

What is a small wrist size? For men, a small wrist size is anything under 6.5 inches, whereas a small wrist measurement for women is anything under 5.5 inches.

Note that these values are generalizations that hold true for people of a fairly average height and build. If you're a short woman, for example, then 5.5 inches might be considered a normal wrist size rather than a small wrist size.

What is considered a medium wrist size?

A man showing that he has a medium size wrist

What is considered a medium wrist size for men and women? For men, a medium sized wrist is between 6.5 inches and 7.5 inches, whereas for women, a medium size wrist is between 6 inches and 6.5 inches.

What is considered a large wrist circumference?

A big man showing that he has a very large wrist size for males of his age

What is considered a large wrist circumference for males and females? In general, a large wrist size for males is 7.5 inches and above. For females, a large wrist size is 6.5 inches and above.

Conclusion: Is it good to have a normal wrist circumference?

A man showing that he has a normal wrist circumference measurement for a male

Now that you know the average wrist size for women and men, you probably know whether your wrists are big, small, or medium. So, with that in mind, is it good to have a normal wrist circumference?

Having a certain wrist size is neither good nor bad; it's simply an anthropometric measurement that can tell you something about your frame size.

As mentioned, there are other measurements to consider when assessing your frame size, but calculating your wrist circumference can certainly give you a quick indication of whether you're small-boned, large-boned, or somewhere in the middle.

So, in summary, having an average wrist girth measurement is one indication that you have a medium-sized build.

References

  1. MedlinePlus. (2020). Calculating body frame size. https://medlineplus.gov/ency/imagepages/17182.htm
  2. Donelson, S. M., & Gordon, C. C. (1996, September). 1995 Matched Anthropometric Database of U.S Marine Corps Personnel: Summary Statistics. https://www.humanics-es.com/ADA316646.pdf
  3. Mitchell, K. B., Choi, H. J., & Garlie, T. N. (2017). Anthropometry And Range Of Motion Of The Encumbered Soldier. U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center. https://apps.dtic.mil/sti/pdfs/AD1028746.pdf
  4. Average wrist size. (2018). Https://Forum.Tz-Uk.Com. https://forum.tz-uk.com/showthread.php?416517-Average-wrist-size
  5. Average wrist circumference, by age. (2012, July 11). Census at School | Recensement à l’école. https://censusatschool.ca/data-results/2006-07/wrist-circumference/
  6. Öztürk, A., Çiçek, B., Mazıcıoğlu, M. M., Zararsız, G., & Kurtoğlu, S. (2017). Wrist Circumference and Frame Size Percentiles in 6-17-Year-Old Turkish Children and Adolescents in Kayseri. Journal of clinical research in pediatric endocrinology9(4), 329–336. https://doi.org/10.4274/jcrpe.4265
  7. McDowell MA, Fryar CD, Ogden CL. Anthropometric reference data for children and adults: United States, 1988–1994. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 11(249). 2009
  8. Shafiee, G., Qorbani, M., Heshmat, R., Djalalinia, S., Motlagh, M., Arefirad, T., Mahdavi Gorabi, A., Najafi, F., Asayesh, H. & Kelishadi, R. (2018). Wrist circumference as a novel predictor of obesity in children and adolescents: the CASPIAN-IV study. Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism, 31(7), 717-725. https://doi.org/10.1515/jpem-2017-0206
  9. Lee, K. M. N., Rogers‐LaVanne, M. P., Galbarczyk, A., Jasienska, G., & Clancy, K. B. H. (2020). Bone density and frame size in adult women: Effects of body size, habitual use, and life history. American Journal of Human Biology, 33(2). https://doi.org/10.1002/ajhb.23502

If you're wondering whether or not your 6 inch wrist is in line with the average male wrist size, then you're in the right place. Drawing on countless anthropometric studies, I set out to learn just how big or small 6 inch wrists really are for males and females. Here's what I found.

See How Your Wrists Compare:

Is a 6 inch wrist small for a man?

A man showing how small his 6 inch wrist is

Is a 6 inch wrist small for a man? Yes, according to anthropometric research, a 6 inch wrist circumference is definitely small for a man. Specifically, 6 inch wrists are 0.75 to 0.9 inches smaller than average for an adult male. [1]

To give just one example of why 6" wrists are small for a man, a US survey of military personnel that was published in 2017 found that most men typically had 6.7 inch wrists or thereabouts. [2]

So, while a 6 inch wrist measurement isn't tiny for a man—there are definitely people who have skinnier wrists than you—6 in wrists are clearly on the small side for a male and could be an indication that you have a slim build.

Just note that frame size should encompass more than just the size of your wrists (i.e., the size of your snakes and the length of your clavicles). So don't think that you have "bad genetics" (whatever that really means) just because you have a 6" wrist.

Is a 6 inch wrist big for a woman?

A female showing that she has a 6 inch wrist

Is a 6 inch wrist big for a woman? In most cases, no, a 6 inch wrist is not big for a woman because 6 inch wrists are a normal measurement for an adult female.

Now, if you're really short, then a 6 in wrist measurement might be big for a woman of your height. But in general, 6 inch wrists are a very normal size for an adult woman of a regular height and build.

On the other hand, if you're a female who has 6.5 inch wrists, then that's definitely on the large side and is likely a strong indication that you have a large frame in general.

Of course, at a glance, most people won't be able to tell whether you have 6 inch wrists or 6.5 inch wrists, so you shouldn't be too concerned about your wrists being overly large.

Is a 6.5 inch wrist small?

A man who has a 6.5 inch wrist

Is a 6.5 inch wrist circumference small for a man? Even though a 6.5 inch wrist is ever so slightly smaller than average for a man, I wouldn't classify 6.5 inch wrists as small because they really are only 0.2 or 0.3 inches slimmer than usual.

Also, bear in mind that wrist size is usually based on measurement ranges, with 6.5 inch wrists typically being on the low end of medium. So you're definitely normal if you have a 6.5" wrist.

Additionally, if you measure your wrist with your fingers apart, then your wrists will naturally be a bit bigger, which is to say, they'll be at their full size. This tip might help to push your wrists over the 6.5-inch mark.

How about a 6.3 inch wrist?

Close up of a man's 6.3 inch wrist

How big is a 6.3 inch wrist? Based on the data, 6.3 inch wrists are slightly smaller than usual for a man and a bit bigger than normal for a woman.

That said, there are plenty of men and women out there who have 6.3 inch wrists because it's only just outside of the normal size, so you're definitely not abnormal in any way just because you have a 6.3 inch wrist.

Is a 6.7 inch wrist big or not?

A man showing his 6.7 inch wrist

Is a 6.7 inch wrist big or not? For a man, a 6.7 inch wrist is a very average size, whereas a 6.7 inch wrist is definitely quite a bit bigger than usual for a woman.

A man who has 6.7 inch wrists probably has a regular frame size—he’s neither large-boned nor small-boned.

On the other hand, if a woman has 6.7 inch wrists, then that's a strong indication that she has a large frame for a female. Perhaps she's very tall or just so happens to have thick joints.

Are 6 inch wrists a good size for a bodybuilder?

A bodybuilder showing his big 6 inch wrist to the camera

So, are 6 inch wrists a good size for a bodybuilder? Yes, in general, a 6 inch wrist is a good size for a bodybuilder because when your wrists are relatively small, your forearms and upper arms will naturally look bigger.

And just remember, bodybuilding is based on aesthetics and not circumference measurements. 

If you and a competitor both have the same arm size, but you have smaller wrists, then your arms will automatically look bigger because there's a bigger size difference between your wrists and arms, which helps to accentuate your biceps, triceps, and forearms.

On the other hand, if you want to make your arms as big as humanly possible, then having thick joins is always optimal.

After all, larger bones have more space to store muscle tissue, so it just makes physiological sense that those with larger wrists will naturally be able to build bigger arms than those with 6 inch wrists.

Of course, there's more that goes into building your biceps, triceps, and forearms than just your wrists. Indeed, your hormone levels, training intensity, and dietary discipline all greatly influence how much mass you can gain.

So don't think that you're cursed just because you have 6 inch wrists or 6.5 inch wrists because you might well surpass your perceived limits by training hard and consistently.

In conclusion: Is it good to have 6 inch wrists?

A woman with 6 inch wrists holding her phone

Objectively speaking, having a 6 inch wrist or a 6.5 inch wrist is neither good nor bad. Rather, the size of your wrists is simply one way to assess your frame size.

That said, most men with 6 inch wrists typically wish that their wrists were thicker. So, in this case, it might not be ideal to have 6 inch wrists which, admittedly, are on the small side for an adult male.

References

  1. YOLDAŞ, A. (2020). The Comparison of Measurements of the Wrist, Hand and Finger Parameters Between Female and Male. Kahramanmaraş Sütçü İmam Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi Dergisi. https://doi.org/10.17517/ksutfd.599786
  2. Mitchell, K. B., Choi, H. J., & Garlie, T. N. (2017). Anthropometry And Range Of Motion Of The Encumbered Soldier. U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center. https://apps.dtic.mil/sti/pdfs/AD1028746.pdf

If you have a 7 inch wrist, then your wrists are slightly larger than the average male wrist size. But just how big are 7 inch wrists?

That's the main topic of this article. After pouring through countless anthropometric studies and research papers, I have a pretty good idea of how big 7" wrists are for men and women.

Related Wrist Measurement Guides:

Is a 7 inch wrist small?

A man showing his small 7 inch wrist

Is a 7 inch wrist small? No, a 7 inch wrist is definitely not small for a man and is, in fact, slightly above average for an adult male.

While 7 inch wrists aren't necessarily big—I'd definitely consider 7 inches to be a medium measurement for a man—they're miles away from being considered small.

If you read around online, then you'll probably be told sooner or later that 7 in wrists are the normal size for a man. However, statistically speaking, a 7 inch wrist is actually 0.2 to 0.3 inches bigger than usual for an adult male.

Wrist circumference is often used to estimate frame size. [1] However, it's important to understand that there's more to frame size (i.e., clavicle length) than just the size of your wrists.

Still, a 7" wrist is a perfectly normal measurement for a man.

For a woman, on the other hand, a 7 inch wrist is very large indeed. Any female who has 7 inch wrists almost certainly has a big skeletal structure and is probably very tall. So while it's not bad for a woman to have a 7 inch wrist, it is a strong sign that she has a very large build.

How big is a 7.25 inch wrist?

A male model who has a 7.25 inch wrist

How big is a 7.25 inch wrist? Statistically, a 7.25 inch wrist is 0.5 inches bigger than average for an adult man.

But since the wrist size categories of small, medium, and large and based on circumference ranges, it would be inaccurate to say that 7.25 inch wrists are big even though they are larger than average.

In reality, 7.25 inch wrists are on the upper end of normal/medium, meaning that, even though most men don't have 7.25 inch wrists, there are still plenty of men who do.

Is a 7.5 inch wrist big?

A man showing his big 7.5 inch wrist to the camera

Is a 7.5 inch wrist big or not? Yes, a 7.5 inch wrist is definitely big for a man because it's around 0.75 inches bigger than usual for an adult male.

If you have 7.5 inch wrists, then you can definitely say that you have large wrists. You might also have a big frame in general if you have a 7.5 inch wrist circumference because 7.5 inches is considerably larger than normal for a male wrist.

So, while 7.5 inch wrists aren't absolutely huge, they are much bigger than usual because the vast majority of men definitely don't have a 7.5 inch wrist size.

How big is a 7 inch wrist for bodybuilding?

A bodybuilder showing his 7 inch wrist

How big is a 7 inch wrist for bodybuilding? A 7 inch wrist is a good size for bodybuilding because it's slightly above average in circumference.

However, a 7 inch wrist isn't so thick that it will make your forearm or upper arm look small. Indeed, given an equivalent arm measurement, having a smaller wrist will always make your arms look bigger because there will be a greater size difference between your wrist and arms, which helps to accentuate your muscles.

Still, for maximizing your muscle growth, it's always best to have thick joints, and large wrists are no exception.

Research shows that wrist circumference correlates with upper arm lean mass, so it seems like those with bigger wrists also tend to have more muscular arms. [2]

This makes perfect physiological sense because bigger bones simply have more space to store muscle tissue.

Of course, in bodybuilding, your physique is assessed based on how it looks—not on your circumference measurements.

So, unless you want to be a mass monster, having 7 inch wrists is ideal because you have plenty of potential for upper arms mass while still having joints that accentuate your forearms, biceps, and triceps.

After all, many bodybuilders have small skeletons but massive amounts of muscle, so it seems like that's the way to go for looking as big and as filled out as possible.

In conclusion: Is a 7 inch wrist big or not?

A man showing that he has 7 inch wrists

In summary, while a 7 inch wrist isn't big in the grand scheme of things, 7 inch wrists are definitely still a bit bigger than usual for an adult man.

Based on all of the data that I've looked at, 7.5 inch wrists are pretty big and can definitely be considered one indication of a fairly large frame.

Of course, there's more that goes into calculating your frame size and muscular potential than just the size of your wrists. But still, it's helpful to know that 7 inch wrists are a good size for a man.

References

  1. Guzman‐de La Garza, F. J., Cerino Peñaloza, M. S., García Leal, M., Salinas Martínez, A. M., Alvarez Villalobos, N. A., & Cordero Franco, H. F. (2022). Anthropometric parameters to estimate body frame size in children and adolescents: A systematic review. American Journal of Human Biology, 34(6). https://doi.org/10.1002/ajhb.23720
  2. Cavedon, V., Milanese, C., & Zancanaro, C. (2020). Are body circumferences able to predict strength, muscle mass and bone characteristics in obesity? A preliminary study in women. International journal of medical sciences17(7), 881–891. https://doi.org/10.7150/ijms.41713

If you're curious about whether or not having an 8 inch wrist gives you an average wrist measurement, then this article is for you.

After pouring through tons of measurement data, I have a pretty clear idea of how big or small 8 inch wrists really are. So if you want to know what having an 8 inch wrist or an 8.5 inch wrist means for your body, keep reading to learn the answer.

Compare More Wrist Sizes:

Is an 8 inch wrist big?

A man showing his big 8 inch wrist

Is an 8 inch wrist big for a man? Yes, based on all of the available data, an 8 inch wrist is very big for a man and is a strong indication that you have a large frame. Specifically, 8 inch wrists are about 1.25 inches bigger than average for an adult male.

If you're a man who has 8" wrists, then it's very likely that people will notice that you have big wrists at some point, considering that they're around 17% bigger than normal for a male!

Now, having 8 inch wrists isn't a guarantee of having a large frame. Indeed, there are some short guys who have an 8 inch wrist. Still, most men who have 8 in wrists also tend to be quite tall and have a large bone structure.

And besides, research does show that wrist circumference is correlated with upper arm muscle mass, [1] which does make sense considering that bigger bones can hold more muscle tissue.

In case you're wondering, an 8 inch wrist is absolutely massive for a woman. Eight inch wrists are so big for a female, in fact, that you could probably go your entire life without ever meeting a woman who has 8 inch wrists.

Still, there are probably a few women out there—women who're really tall with big frames—who have an 8 inch wrist circumference or something close to it.

How big is an 8.5 inch wrist?

A weight lifter with an 8.5 inch wrist

Is an 8.5 inch wrist big? Yes, an 8.5 inch wrist is extremely big and is virtually a guarantee that you have a large frame. It's very rare to meet someone who genuinely has 8.5 inch wrists.

If you have 8.5 inch wrists, then you'll probably also have big hands and large upper arms because an 8.5 inch wrist size is a strong sign that your bones are really big.

Why do some people have 8 inch wrists?

A senior man who clearly has 8 inch wrists

The main reason for having an 8 inch wrist is a large bone structure. Some people just have genetically thicker joints than others, which often means having big wrists.

Another reason why some people have 8 inch wrists is excess body fat. Even though the wrists tend to stay fairly lean during weight gain, given enough body fat, your circumference measurement can definitely increase.

Indeed, research suggests that wrist circumference is a predictor of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. [2] So if you have 8 inch wrists or 8.5 inch wrists and you're obese, then that could be a sign that some of your wrist size consists of fat tissue as well as bone mass.

Or, to say it another way, if you have really big wrists, then that could be a sign that you're at risk for certain diseases if you have a high BMI.

There are, of course, people who have an 8 inch wrist measurement purely due to their large skeletal structure.

Is it good to have 8 inch wrists for bodybuilding?

A bodybuilder showing his 8 inch wrist to the camera

In terms of maximizing hypertrophy, having 8 inch wrists is definitely good for bodybuilding because, all else being equal, thick joints give you a greater muscular potential.

This makes sense biologically because big bones simply have more space to accumulate muscle tissue.

So while having an 8 inch wrist or an 8.5 inch wrist isn't a guarantee of bodybuilding success, you almost certainly have a higher muscular potential than some with significantly smaller wrists.

On the other hand, if you're just a recreational lifter with decent arms, then your arms might not actually look that big because your wrists—being large—won't accentuate your forearms and upper arms that much.

So, in a sense, having small wrists can give you the illusion of having big arms, which makes sense considering that many professional bodybuilders have small frames.

Still, in terms of maximizing your muscle growth, it's always best to have bigger wrists—and an 8 in wrist is definitely big.

The verdict on having 8 inch wrists

An athlete who has an 8 inch wrist size

As I explained throughout this article, most people don't have 8 inch wrists or anything close. Although having an 8 inch wrist might not seem big, it is when you understand that the wrists hold very minimal fat.

So unless you're seriously overweight, then it's highly likely that virtually all of your 8 inch wrist size consists of bone mass.

This has its advantages. For example, having 8 inch wrists likely means that you have a bigger frame than most men, which might give you more self-confidence.

If you're into strength sports, then having an 8 inch wrist or an 8.5 inch wrist is especially beneficial because people with large wrists are capable of building more total muscle mass, which will enable you to lift heavier weights.

References

  1. Cavedon, V., Milanese, C., & Zancanaro, C. (2020). Are body circumferences able to predict strength, muscle mass and bone characteristics in obesity? A preliminary study in women. International Journal of Medical Sciences, 17(7), 881–891. https://doi.org/10.7150/ijms.41713
  2. Jahangiri Noudeh, Y., Hadaegh, F., Vatankhah, N., Momenan, A. A., Saadat, N., Khalili, D., & Azizi, F. (2013). Wrist Circumference as a Novel Predictor of Diabetes and Prediabetes: Results of Cross-Sectional and 8.8-Year Follow-up Studies. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 98(2), 777–784. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2012-2416

One thing's for sure; if you have a 9 inch wrist, then you definitely don't have a normal wrist size. But is this necessarily a bad thing?

Since the wrists hold very little fat, having 9 inch wrists is most likely a sign that you have a large bone structure. However, your 9" wrist could also be the sign of something more serious. More on that later.

Compare More Wrist Measurements:

How big is a 9 inch wrist?

A man with 9 inch wrists holding a football

How big is a 9 inch wrist? Based on all of the available anthropometric data, a 9 inch wrist is extremely big for a man because 9 inch wrists are over 2 inches bigger than average for an adult male.

Although large wrists aren't a guarantee of having a large frame (for example, you could be short with thick wrists), 9 inch wrists are so big that pretty much anyone with a 9 inch wrist size is going to have an at least somewhat large frame.

A 9 inch wrist circumference is so big that if you genuinely have a 9 in wrist, people will most likely comment on how thick your wrists are. You also might struggle to find watches or bracelets that fit you well.

Obviously, 9 inch wrists are even bigger for a woman. I've certainly never encountered a woman who has 9" wrists, but that isn't to say that there aren't a few genetic outliers who do have wrists that large.

How about a 9.5 inch wrist?

A man with a 9.5 inch wrist holding his phone

Again, a 9.5 inch wrist measurement is absolutely massive and is a strong indication that you have a massive frame.

The only people who tend to have 9.5 inch wrists are those with gigantic frames (think professional strongman competitors and basketball players).

Even if you had relatively big wrists to begin with and then became obese, there's a high chance that you still wouldn't have 9.5 inch wrists.

How does someone get a 9 inch wrist?

A man showing that he has a 9 inch wrist size

The main reason that someone would have a 9 inch wrist is simply due to their genetically large wrists. Unlike other body parts, the wrists don't hold much fat, meaning that most of your wrist girth consists of bone as opposed to muscle and fat.

Now, some research does suggest that very large wrists could be a predictor of metabolic syndrome, but this only appears to be the case if you're severely overweight or obese. [1]

If the vast majority of your 9 inch wrist circumference is bone—and if there appears to be minimal fat around your wrists—then you probably have genetically large wrists.

Even if you have really muscular forearms, it's unlikely that you'd get significantly bigger wrists because there isn't much muscle tissue just below the wrist bones.

Is it good to have 9 inch wrists?

A man with 9 inch wrists holding his head

As I've said before, a given wrist size isn't good or bad unless it's indicative of some kind of health problem (such as you being obese). Rather, having 9 inch wrists is simply one very strong sign that you have a large skeletal structure.

So is this a good thing?

If you like the idea of being physically bigger than the majority of other guys, then yes. After all, large wrists give you a greater muscular potential.

But if you'd rather maintain a slim physique and a low BMI, then it's probably advantageous to have wrists that are a fair bit smaller than 9 inches.

Additionally, you might struggle to find nice watches that fit you well if you have 9" wrists.

Conclusion: Do many people have 9 inch wrists?

A man's 9 in wrists

Having a 9 inch wrist is very uncommon. As mentioned, the only people who have genuine 9 inch wrists are those with massive frames and those who are obese.

Although 9 inch wrists are "only" 2 inches bigger than normal, that's a huge size difference when it comes to a tiny joint like the wrists.

Ultimately, if you have a 9 inch wrist or a 9.5 inch wrist, then you're in a very unique position and probably have a solid build with large bones.

References

  1. Ahilan, V., Krishna, V. G., Prasad, H. K., Narayanasamy, K., & Krishnamoorthy, N. (2021). Utility of wrist circumference in recognition of metabolic syndrome in overweight and obese South Indian children and adolescents. Journal of pediatric endocrinology & metabolism : JPEM35(1), 65–71. https://doi.org/10.1515/jpem-2021-0376

Anyone who has a 10 inch wrist almost certainly has a massive frame—it's virtually a guarantee.

Sure, there might be a few morbidly obese individuals who have 10 inch wrists due to the sheer amount of fat on their frame, but, by and large, the wrists tend to stay very lean during weight gain.

As such, if you have 10 inch wrists, then it's very likely that the majority of your wrist girth consists of bone mass as opposed to fat tissue and skeletal muscle tissue.

See Also:

How big is a 10 inch wrist?

A man showing his 10 inch wrists to the camera

So, just how big is a 10 inch wrist? Statistically speaking, a 10 inch wrist is over 3 inches bigger than normal for an adult male.

That might not sound like a lot, but 3 inches is a huge size difference when we're talking about a small body part like the wrists.

It suffices to say that most men definitely don't have 10 inch wrists or anywhere close to it, so you can definitely consider yourself to be large-boned if you have a 10" wrist.

How about a 10.5 inch wrist?

A man with 10.5 inch wrists eating a burger

A 10.5 inch wrist is absolutely massive. Indeed, 10.5 inch wrists are so big that there's probably a decent chance that you measured incorrectly!

Still, there are bound to be some people who have genetically huge wrists, but these individuals are few and far between.

The only people that I can think of who might have 10.5 inch wrists are professional strongmen and pro basketball players—athletes who have really big skeletal frames.

Does anyone have an 11 inch wrist or a 12 inch wrist?

A man with 12 inch wrists doing push-ups

I certainly don't know of anyone who has an 11 inch wrist or a 12 inch wrist. But that's not to say that there aren't a few gifted individuals who just so happen to have wrists that size.

As I alluded to earlier, there might be some morbidly obese people who have 11 inch wrists or 12 inch wrists due to the sheer amount of fat on their bodies. But since these individuals are big everywhere, you don't really notice their large wrists.

As for non-obese people with 10+ inch wrists, they'd need to have a massive bone structure. More on that in a sec.

How would someone even get a 10 inch wrist?

A man with 11 inch wrists holding a football

Besides being obese, the only way to get a 10 inch wrist circumference is to have genetically huge wrists.

Examples of people who could plausibly have 10 inch wrists—based on their pictures—include arm wrestlers Denis Cyplenkov and Jeff Dabe, as well as actor and bodybuilder Olivier Richters, more commonly known as The Dutch Giant.

It's also reported that Andre the Giant had 12 inch wrists, which is about as big as it gets. [1] With that in mind, I don't think that there is anyone with 13 inch wrists, especially considering that most people's forearms aren't even that big!

Even if you had really muscular forearms, you still wouldn't have 10 inch wrists because there's not much skeletal muscle tissue just below the forearm bones.

In conclusion: Is it good or bad to have 10 inch wrists?

A man with 10 inch wrists holding a phone

As I'm fond of saying, having 10 inch wrists is only bad if it's an indication that you're obese. Some research, after all, does find a link between large wrists and cardio metabolic risk factors. [2]

However, it's also possible to have a 10 inch wrist measurement purely due to having a large bone structure.

One good thing about having 10 inch wrists, depending on your point of view, is that you'll have a very high muscular potential because big wrists are indicative of a large frame, which can hold a lot of muscle mass.

So if you like the idea of being much more muscular than regular folk, then having 10 inch wrists is definitely a good thing.

References

  1. Greenberg, K. E. (2017, October 3). Remembering Andre the Giant’s Larger Than Life Career and Complexities. Bleacher Report. https://bleacherreport.com/articles/1930105-remembering-andre-the-giants-larger-than-life-career-and-complexities
  2. Amini, A., Soltanian, N., Iraj, B., Askari, G., Ebneyamin, S., Ghias, M., Hajian, H., Zahed, A., & Amini, M. (2012). Association of wrist circumference with cardio metabolic risk factors. JPMA. The Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association62(3 Suppl 2), S34–S36.

If you have a 4 inch wrist, then you definitely have a below average wrist size for women and men. So if you want to learn precisely what having 4 inch wrists or 4.5 inch wrists means for your body, then this article is for you.

Related Wrist Guides:

How small is a 4 inch wrist?

A female showing her 4 inch wrist

How small is a 4 inch wrist? Based on real-life anthropometric data, a 4 inch wrist circumference is extremely small. The vast majority of adults do not have 4 inch wrists of any description.

For a man, a 4 inch wrist is nearly 3 inches smaller than usual.

For a woman, 4 inch wrists are around 2 inches smaller than normal.

So what would actually cause someone to have 4" wrists? Well, a young child who's still growing could plausibly have 4 in wrists. But an adult?

That's highly unlikely. You'd need to have a truly tiny bone structure to have 4 inch wrists. So if you think that you have 4 inch wrists, then there's a chance that you might have measured your wrists incorrectly.

Is a 4.5 inch wrist small?

A person showing their 4.5 inch wrist

Is a 4.5 inch wrist small? Yes, even though a 4.5 inch wrist is almost 12% larger than a 4 inch wrist, 4.5 inch wrists are still extremely small for a fully-grown adult (and even for a teenager).

If you have some kind of genetic abnormality, then you might have a 4.5 inch wrist. But for a regular adult, 4.5 inch wrists are very small and are a strong sign that you have a very small bone structure.

The same holds true for those with 4.75 inch wrists, which is still a very small measurement for an adult.

Is it good or bad to have a 4 inch wrist?

A woman showing that she has 4 inch wrists

As long as your 4 inch wrists aren't a sign of some kind of health problem, then there's nothing wrong with having a 4 inch wrist measurement.

After all, some people have to have smaller wrists than others. Otherwise, we wouldn't be able to categorize certain sizes as small, medium, large, etc.

Of course, some people are insecure about their wrists being too small, especially if they've received hurtful comments about their 4 inch wrists in the past.

Most people have body parts that they don't like, and seeing as the wrists are a highly visible area, I can understand why some people might wish that their wrists were thicker.

Can you increase the size of your 4 inch wrists?

A man training is 4 inch wrist with weights

Unfortunately, you can't make your 4 inch wrists bigger to any significant extent unless you're still growing.

That said, strengthening your forearms will go some way to make your wrists a bit thicker, but don't expect dramatic results.

Doing wrist curls (both supinated and pronated variations) and squeezing a hand gripper will add muscle mass to the area just below your wrist bone.

One of the blessings of having 4 inch wrists—depending on your point of view—is that because your wrists are small, they'll automatically accentuate your forearms and upper arms and thus make them look more developed.

The verdict on having 4 inch wrists

A woman who has 4.5 inch wrists

Although most people don't have a 4 inch wrist circumference, there are still some people who do. So you're definitely not alone if you have 4" wrists.

Since you can't really make your 4 inch wrist or 4.5 wrist any bigger, you're best off just accepting the wrist hand that you've been dealt and focusing on the body parts that you can control (such as your forearms).

If you have a 5 inch wrist as a man or a woman, then you definitely have a small wrist girth measurement. But is this necessarily a bad thing? And how does having 5 inch wrists actually affect your body?

This guide will discuss just how small 5 inch wrists really are and will then give you some advice on improving the appearance of your 5 inch wrist or 5.5 inch wrist.

See How Your Wrists Compare:

Is a 5 inch wrist small for a male?

A person showing how small their 5 inch wrist is

Is a 5 inch wrist small for a male? Yes, based on the data, a 5 inch wrist is very small for a male. To be specific, 5 inch wrists are more than 1.5 inches smaller than average for an adult man.

As such, if you're a man who has 5 inch wrists, then you definitely have skinny wrists and may also have a small bone structure. But as you'll learn later on, this isn't always a bad thing.

Of course, there's more to determining your frame size than just measuring your wrists. Still, it would be highly unlikely that someone with a thin 5 inch wrist circumference would have thick joints elsewhere.

Males who are shorter and who have smaller skeletal structures in general are those who most commonly have 5" wrists. You might also have a 5" wrist if you're a growing teenager.

Is a 5 inch wrist small for a female?

A female showing her 5 inch wrist

Is a 5 inch wrist small for a woman? Yes, a 5 inch wrist is definitely small for a woman of just about any height. If you're a female who has 5 inch wrists, then you definitely have slim wrists.

Statistically, most women have wrists that are 0.5 to 1 inches larger than our 5-inch example. So there's a high chance that a woman who has 5 in wrists also has a small frame.

Since women are typically shorter than men and usually have smaller skeletal structures, it's more common for women to have a 5 inch wrist measurement.

In other words, 5 inch wrists are small for a woman and extremely small for a man. This is also true if you have 5.25 inch wrists, for example.

Is a 5.5 inch wrist small?

A person who has a 5.5 inch wrist

Is a 5.5 inch wrist small? For a woman, a 5.5 inch wrist is slightly on the slim side—on the lower end of the "normal" size range. However, for a man, a 5.5 inch wrist is definitely very small because such a measurement is more than an inch smaller than usual for a male.

Although it might not seem that way, 5.5 inch wrists are considerably larger than 5 inch wrists because half an inch of extra circumference is a lot when it comes to a small joint like the wrists.

Still, there's no denying that a 5.5 inch wrist is still a very small measurement for just about anyone. The one exception to this is small women. If you're a short lady, then 5.5 inch wrists might be normal for women of your height.

On the other hand, if you have a 5.9 inch wrist, then you might as well round your measurement up.

Is it good to have 5 inch wrists?

A man who clearly has 5 inch wrists

As I often say, the size of your wrists is simply one way to assess your frame size. So unless your wrists are the sign of a problem (which, at 5 inches, they almost certainly aren't), having 5 inch wrists is nothing to worry about.

That said, depending on your point of view, there are a few pros and cons to having a 5 inch wrist measurement.

First off, many men are worried that their wrists are too small, which can harm their self-confidence. But even though the majority of men have wrists that are larger than 5 inches, there's still a good number of adult males who have 5 inch wrists and 5.5 inch wrists.

On a more positive note, having small wrists will make your forearms and upper arms look bigger, which can help you to sculpt an aesthetic physique. So for bodybuilding purposes, it can be quite advantageous to have a 5 inch wrist because your small wrists will accentuate your arms.

On the other hand, small wrists give you a lower muscular potential, all else being equal. This is simply because small joints have less space to accumulate muscle mass.

Is it possible to make your 5 inch wrists bigger?

A man training his 5 inch wrists with weights

Since the wrists are a bone, it's likely not possible to make your 5 inch wrists significantly bigger. However, even though the wrists have minimal fat and muscle tissue around them, there is still some soft tissue around your wrists.

This is one reason why obese individuals tend to have fairly large wrists. But since being overweight is undesirable from a physical health standpoint, your best bet is to increase the muscularity of your forearms, which might result in a very modest circumference gain.

Be warned, however, that building your forearms will make your wrists look even smaller (but remember that the reverse of this is true as well—thin wrists will make your forearms look thicker).

Do wrist curls and reverse wrist curls twice per week. You can also train with a hand gripper, which is a convenient tool if you don't have weights to do forearm curls.

In conclusion: Should you be okay with having a 5 inch wrist?

A person showing their small 5.5 inch wrist

There's nothing wrong with having a 5 inch wrist circumference, just like there's nothing wrong with having wrists that are larger than 5 inches.

Since you really can't do much to change the size of your wrists, your best bet is to just embrace your 5 inch wrists (remember, there are plenty of other people like you) and focus on the areas of your body that you can control.

If you're curious about whether or not anyone actually has a 2 inch wrist or a 3 inch wrist, then you're in the right place.

This short yet detailed guide will discuss if it's actually possible for a person to only have 2 inch wrists or 3 inches wrists, as well as how you can make your own wrists bigger.

Related Wrist Guides:

Does anyone have 2 inch wrists or 3 inch wrists?

A man showing that he has a 3 inch wrist

If we're talking about circumference, then no healthy adult has 2 inch wrists or 3 inch wrists. Indeed, even children have bigger wrists than that!

So unless you have some sort of wrist-related deformity, it's simply not possible to only have a 2 inch wrist or a 3 inch wrist.

On the other hand, if you're talking about width, then 2 or 3 inches is much more realistic. This is probably what most people mean when they talk about having 2 inch wrists or 3 inch wrists.

Knowing how wide your wrists are is important when you're buying a watch, so it's good to measure the width of your wrists as well as the circumference of your wrists.

Is it possible to increase your wrists by 2 or 3 inches?

A man working his 2 inch wrists with weights

Unless you're still growing, then it's simply not possible to add 2 or 3 inches to your wrists. This is because the vast majority of your wrist size is bone mass as opposed to muscle mass and fat tissue.

Now, if you got really obese, then your wrists would likely get quite a bit thicker. But you'd probably need to be morbidly obese in order to see significant circumference gains.

Obviously, gaining loads of extra weight is undesirable from a physical health perspective, so you're pretty much stuck with whatever size wrists you currently have.

You might be able to put a bit of size on your wrists by bulking up your forearms via hand grip squeezes and wrist curls. But even in the best-case scenario, you might only gain 0.3 to 0.5 inches. And that really is the best-case scenario (i.e., if you also increase your body weight).

In conclusion

A person's 3 inch wrists

As you've hopefully learned, no healthy adult has a 2 inch wrist or a 3 inch wrist. As such, you shouldn't strive to make your wrists that small because even if you do lose weight, it's not like your bones are going to shrink.

We all have different bone structures, but nobody that I've ever encountered has 2 inch wrists or 3 inch wrists.

As for whether you can gain 2 or 3 inches on your wrists, the answer is almost certainly no unless you're still growing at a rapid rate.

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