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What does a 60 inch waist look like?

Learn how you can slim your 60 inch waist by following proven fat loss methods.
Written By  Brianna Martin
Last Updated on 9th March 2022
A man grabbing the fat on his big 60 inch waist

While a 60 inch waist is definitely not a normal waist size for men and women, it’s still possible to slim your 60″ waist by leaving your sedentary lifestyle behind and making healthier food choices.

Of course, some people naturally store more fat on their stomachs than others due to their genetics.

But as any obesity researcher will tell you, genetics alone don’t explain why someone has a 60 in waist or a 61 inch waist.

With this in mind, the following guide shows you the dangers of having a 60 inch belly and then provides you with some practical stomach-slimming strategies for getting in better shape and improving your physical health.

What does a 60 inch waist look like?

A fat man showing what a 60 inch waist looks like

What does a 60 inch waist look like? While you shouldn’t feel pressured to have a particular kind of body, there’s no getting around the fact that a 60 inch waist looks huge. The reason for this is that anyone with a genuine 60″ waist will naturally have what scientists refer to as abdominal or central obesity.

Storing body fat on your stomach will obviously make your belly stick out, which may make some individuals feel self-conscious, especially if they can’t find clothes that fit them well.

Now, if you’re tall, then your 60 inch waistline will actually look smaller (but not outright small). This is because when you’re tall, your waist is effectively stretched out over a longer surface area.

On the other hand, when you’re short, your waist is naturally more compact and bunched up, which can increase its visibility by making it protrude further out.

How big is a 60 inch waist for a woman?

An obese woman having her 60 inch waist measured

How big is a 60 inch waist for a woman? Based on anthropometric data collected from thousands of American women, a 60 inch waist is over 20 inches bigger than average for a female. This is especially problematic considering that the average measurements are already too large for a woman to live in good health (indeed, health practitioners often advise women to keep their waists below 35 inches).

It’s also often recommended that both men and women keep their waist circumference to less than half of their height, which is known as your waist-to-height ratio. [1]

Your waist measurement is an important value because it measures adiposity (basically how much body fat you have) rather than merely how heavy you are (which is what BMI does).

How large is a 60 inch waist for a man?

An obese man showing how big a 60 inch waist is

A 60 inch waist is extremely large for a man and is certainly too big for a male to live in good health. Although men tend to have more bone and abdominal muscle mass than women, this extra lean mass definitely doesn’t account for all of the inches of a 60 inch belly.

As you lose weight, you want to keep an eye on your waist-to-height ratio (which should ideally be less than 0.5), as it’s an excellent indicator of your obesity status. [2]

Many men store far more fat on their stomachs than on their legs, hips, and upper body, so you can definitely see some big reductions in waist size once you get yourself on a good stomach-slimming regime.

Is it possible to lose your 60 inch belly?

A woman with a 60 in waist doing some exercise

As long as you’re able-bodied and have been given the go-ahead to exercise by your doctor, it’s possible to significantly reduce the size of your 60 in waist.

Weight loss comes down to manipulating two key variables; your calorie intake and your energy expenditure. In other words, you need to focus on your diet and exercise routine if you want to maximize weight loss. [3]

By consuming lower-calorie foods and eating smaller portions, you’ll naturally be in a calorie deficit which, when paired with frequent and intense exercise, can really accelerate the fat-burning process.

If you’re losing 1-2 pounds per week, then you know that you’re on the right track. It can be helpful to track your calories and macros so that you know that you’re not overeating. Ideally, you want to create a calorie deficit of around 500 calories per day.

As for your workouts, you can definitely go to the gym if you want to have access to the latest equipment and fitness classes. But a gym membership is by no means a necessity for slimming your 60″ waist.

Indeed, with just a small amount of space, you can burn a ton of calories by running on the spot, doing jumping jacks and burpees, and strengthening your legs with squats. Add in a cheap pair of dumbbells and some resistance bands for virtually limitless exercise possibilities.

One of my favorite fat-blasting techniques is to superset all of my exercises (or even do a circuit). This way, I’m sculpting my muscles and improving my cardiovascular fitness because I’m doing the strength training drills without any rest.

Conclusion: How soon can you slim your 60 inch waistline?

A fat man measuring his 60 inch belly

As any personal trainer or dietician will tell you, meaningful weight loss takes time to manifest itself.

And the best way to keep track of your progress is to take a weekly or monthly stomach measurement. Just keep in mind that weight loss isn’t always linear, so you shouldn’t panic if you don’t lose any stomach size in a particular week.

Obviously, since you didn’t end up with a 60 inch waist in a month, it’s going to take a while to slim your waistline; patience is key. You’re much better off losing a modest amount of weight every week than you are yo-yoing up and down in weight.

References

  1. Hu, F. B. (2007). Obesity and Mortality. Archives of Internal Medicine, 167(9), 875. https://doi.org/10.1001/archinte.167.9.875
  2. Welborn, T. A., & Dhaliwal, S. S. (2007). Preferred clinical measures of central obesity for predicting mortality. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 61(12), 1373–1379. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602656
  3. Amy, A. (2015, June 16). Which is more important for weight loss: Dieting or exercising? CBS News. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/which-is-more-important-to-lose-weight-dieting-or-exercising/
Brianna Martin
Brianna Martin has worked in health and wellness media for more than 8 years. She uses her organisational skills and passion for fitness to organise our team of content creators. As a former track and field athlete, Bri still hits the gym hard 5 times a week to maintain her flexibility and athleticism.
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