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Is it bad to have 63 inch hips?

Find out why some people have 63 inch hips.
Written By  Brianna Martin
Last Updated on 2nd July 2022
An obese man's 63 inch hips

Considering that the average hip circumference is 23 inches less than 63 inches, can you really live a healthy life while walking around with 63 inch hips?

Since having 63" hips is virtually a guarantee of being obese, you simply can't enjoy your best health while having hips this size. But that doesn't mean that you should give up hope.

After explaining why having a 63 inch butt is bad for you, I'll discuss how you can take control of your health and slim your 63 in hips.

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How could someone have 63 inch hips?

Close up of an overweight man's 63 in hips

The main reasons that somebody would have 63 inch hips are a high body weight and a genetic predisposition to storing fat around their hips.

Although most overweight people don't have 63" hips, if you have a large build and a high body weight, then it's conceivable that your hips could stretch the tape over the 63-inch mark.

You can also have large hips due to having muscular glutes. However, it's not possible to get a 63 inch booty purely because of lean muscle mass. Indeed, pretty much anyone who has a 63 inch butt has the high body fat level and high BMI to match.

How does having 63 inch hips affect your body?

An obese woman measuring her 63 inch hips

Having 63 inch hips is bad for your physical health because it's a strong sign—virtually a guarantee—that you're carrying excess body weight, which can lead to conditions like diabetes and heart disease.

Obviously, many people like having large hips and are happy with the way that they're built. But even though you can be happy with your appearance while being overweight, you simply can't enjoy the health that you deserve while walking around with 63" hips.

Some people who have a 63 inch butt might find physical activity really challenging, which would make losing weight even harder. You definitely don't want to get to the point where the sheer size of your hips affects your ability to function.

Of course, some people are also very self-conscious about having such large hips. In this case, their 63 inch hips can prevent them from going out in public, which again reinforces weight gain through a lack of physical activity.

Is there anything good about having 63" hips?

An overweight man who clearly has a 63 inch hip size

Honestly? No, not from a physical health standpoint. While many obese people have embraced their bodies, it would be irresponsible to say that you can continue to gain weight and still enjoy good health.

That said, there are good things to look forward to. Let me explain.

The more obese you are now, the more dramatic and amazing your transformation will be because there'll be a greater difference between your new and previous body.

Of course, slimming your 63 inch hips doesn't mean becoming skinny. Indeed, you can still maintain your curves—and even enhance them—when you lose weight.

This is because when you lose fat, your waist will get smaller, which, in turn, will make your hips look more prominent and curvy.

In conclusion

A woman who's hips are 63 inches around

As explained throughout this article, anyone who has 63 inch hips should seek to lose some body mass so that they can improve their health and mobility. It really is a lot easier to function when you're not carrying so much excess weight.

Your best bet is to simply start doing some kind of physical activity that you enjoy. This way, you can begin burning calories and enjoying the endorphin rush that comes from regular exercise.

Brianna Martin
Brianna Martin has worked in health and wellness media for more than 8 years. She uses her organisational skills and passion for fitness to organise our team of content creators. As a former track and field athlete, Bri still hits the gym hard 5 times a week to maintain her flexibility and athleticism.
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