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Are 30 inch hips small?

Are 30 inch hips too small for teenagers and adults?
Written By  Brianna Martin
Last Updated on 2nd July 2022
A woman with 30 inch hips

If you have 30 inch hips, then you definitely have a below average hip size for women and men of all ages. But what does this mean for your body?

In this article, you'll learn how small 30" hips really are, what they look like, and whether or not they're a realistic size for an adult.

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Are 30 inch hips small?

A woman who has 30 inch hips

Are 30 inch hips small? Yes, 30 inch hips are very small for both men and women and could be an indication that you're underweight. Anyone who has 30" hips is definitely slim-hipped.

As for whether or not 30 inch hips are too small, this depends on your age, build, and body weight.

For example, since 30 in hips are a normal size for a 10 to 11-year-old child, it's obviously okay for certain children to have a 30 inch hip size. But what about adults?

Most of the time, if an adult has 30 inch hips, then they'll naturally also be underweight, which can lead to malnutrition, a compromised immune system, and even diabetes. [1]

On the other hand, if you're really short, have a slim build, and carry minimal body fat, then it's possible that you could end up with 30" hips.

What do 30 inch hips look like?

A woman's 30 in hips

So, what do 30 inch hips actually look like? This is heavily dependent on the height and build of the person. Let me explain.

Say you're under 5 feet tall and have a lean physique. In this case, 30 inch hips might look completely normal and proportionate to the rest of your body.

On the other side of the coin, if you're fairly tall with 30 in hips, then your hip area will likely look very skinny, and your bones might stick out more, seeing as there will naturally be less soft tissue around them.

One thing's for sure: 30 inch hips definitely don't look big on any healthy adult or teenager. So if you do have 30" hips, then don't think that you have to make your hips any slimmer because—if anything—30 in hips are too small for most people to maintain a healthy BMI.

What size are 30 inch hips?

A chart showing what size 30 inch hips are in women's clothing

What size are 30 inch hips in women's clothing? It depends on the brand, but a lot of the time, 30 inch hips are equal to a women's size XXS, which works out at a US size 00.

How do people get 30" hips?

A woman with a 30 inch butt

Some people have 30" hips due to their genetics, whereas others get them by reducing their body weight. Let's start with the most common reason; genetics.

If you don't tend to store much fat around your hips, then your hips will naturally be much slimmer than those of someone who has a lot of gluteofemoral fat.

Similarly, if you have a small bone structure (narrow hips), then you might naturally have 30 inch hips due to your frame size.

On the other hand, some people who have an average build but a really low body weight might also have 30" hips due to a dearth of gluteal body fat and muscle mass.

Obviously, just because a minority of people do have 30 in hips, this doesn't mean that anyone can get 30 inch hips simply by being slim. Indeed, most people who would be considered slim don't actually have 30" hips!

Conclusion: Is it okay to have 30 inch hips?

A woman who has a 30 inch booty

If you have 30 inch hips because you're still developing or are genetically very slim, then that's most likely okay. After all, everyone has 30 in hips at some point during their physical development.

Conversely, if your 30" hips are a sign that you're underweight, then you should seek to gain weight so that you can enjoy your best health.

You can do this by eating more calories—especially more protein—which will help you to add lean muscle mass to your hips (your glutes) which will increase your measurement.

References

  1. Seidell, J. C., Han, T. S., Feskens, E. J. M., & Lean, M. E. J. (1997). Narrow hips and broad waist circumferences independently contribute to increased risk of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Journal of Internal Medicine, 242(5), 401–406. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2796.1997.00235.x
Brianna Martin
Brianna Martin has worked in health and wellness media for more than 8 years. She uses her organisational skills and passion for fitness to organise our team of content creators. As a former track and field athlete, Bri still hits the gym hard 5 times a week to maintain her flexibility and athleticism.
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