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What size are 51 inch hips?

Learn why you should slim your 51 inch hips.
Written By  Brianna Martin
Last Updated on 2nd July 2022
An obese woman measuring her 51 inch hips

51 inch hips definitely aren't a normal hip size for a female or a male because they're over 10 inches bigger than usual for a US adult.

Of course, you don't always need to strive for normal, but as you'll soon learn, you simply can't enjoy your best health while walking around with 51" hips. It's just not possible.

See More Hip Measurement Guides:

How big are 51 inch hips?

A woman measuring her 51 inch hips

So, just how big are 51 inch hips? According to measurement data, 51 inch hips are 11 inches bigger than normal for women and 12 inches bigger than usual for men.

Even though the hips are naturally a big body part with considerable size variation, an 11-12 inch excess in circumference clearly indicates obesity, which comes with all manner of health concerns.

As I've always said—and the science agrees with this—you can have large hips and still be healthy as long as you have a fairly narrow waist. Indeed, large hips have frequently been shown to have a protective effect against various chronic diseases.

That said, there comes the point when too big is too big, and that cut-off point is almost certainly below 51 inches. In other words, you just can't enjoy optimal physical health while having 51 in hips of any description.

Why do some people have 51 inch hips?

A man who clearly has a 51 inch hip size at a minimum

It's fair to say that some people store much more body fat around their hips than others. This is especially the case with women, who tend to have more gluteofemoral fat and comparatively less fat around their waists.

Additionally, some individuals have wide hip bones, which can definitely add a few inches or more to your circumference measurement.

Similarly, a lot of people have muscular glutes—naturally or as a result of resistance training—which can also greatly affect the size of your hips.

When you add these three variables together—gluteal muscle, hip-width, gluteofemoral fat—it's easy to see why some people can end up with very large hips.

Yet, this doesn't change the fact that having a 51 inch hip size is still bad for your health. Indeed, past a certain point, hip fat is usually accompanied by belly fat, which correlates with visceral fat (the dangerous internal fat that accumulates around your organs).

How can you shrink your 51" hips?

A woman looking at her 51 inch butt in the mirror

Shrinking any body part—including your hips—boils down to being in an energy deficit. This simply means expending more energy than you consume, which you can do by restricting your calorie intake and/or increasing your activity levels.

That's the basics of weight loss. But when it comes to shrinking your 51 in hips specifically, you might want to train your glutes with weights so that you can maintain your curves and develop a strong body.

Doing exercises like squats and hip thrusts, for example, will increase the muscularity of your glutes while burning plenty of calories in the process.

Of course, cardiovascular exercise—which can be as simple as walking—is always useful for slimming down because cardio burns calories and improves your fitness levels.

What size are 51 inch hips?

A chart showing what size 51 inch hips are in women's clothing

The specific size always depends on the brand. However, in a lot of cases, 51 inch hips will work out at a women's 3XL, which is equal to a US size 22-24.

The verdict: How bad is it to have 51 in hips?

A woman showing that she has a 51 inch butt

From a physical health standpoint, having 51 inch hips is bad because it's virtually a guarantee that you're obese.

The good news, however, is that 51" hips aren't huge to the point where moving around becomes really challenging. This means that you can exercise, reduce the size of your 51 in hips, and greatly improve the way you look and feel.

Brianna Martin
Brianna Martin has worked in health and wellness media for more than 8 years. She uses her organisational skills and passion for fitness to organise our team of content creators. As a former track and field athlete, Bri still hits the gym hard 5 times a week to maintain her flexibility and athleticism.
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