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Why is it bad to have 53 inch hips?

Here's how having 53 inch hips affects your health.
Written By  Brianna Martin
Last Updated on 2nd July 2022
A man with 53 inch hips looking out the window

What is the average hip size for a woman? It's definitely a lot more than 53 inches!

To be precise, most people have hips that are 13-14 inches smaller than our 53 inch hip example. So that should tell you just how large 53 inch hips really are. But what does this all mean for your body?

This article explains why having 53" hips is bad for your health and then discusses what you can do about it.

How Do Your Hips Stack Up?

How large are 53 inch hips?

An obese woman measuring her 53 inch hips

So, just how large are 53 inch hips? Based on all of the available measurement data, it's clear that 53 inch hips are extremely large for both men and women.

While having big hips isn't necessarily bad, there comes the point when your hips are so big that they're a sign of obesity. So if your 53 in hips are accompanied by a lot of belly fat, then that's an indication that you should try to lose weight.

The good news is that your 53" hips aren't so huge that they'll prevent you from doing exercise. While intense workouts and fast laps around the track might be out of the question initially, just about anyone can slim their 53 in hips by walking more and reducing their calorie intake.

Best of all, you can still have the large hips and curves that you perhaps desire—while losing weight. This is because when you lose fat, your waist will get much smaller, which will make your hips look more prominent.

And, if you lift weights and do exercises like squats and hip thrusts, you'll actually firm up your glutes and make your hip area look leaner and more aesthetically pleasing.

Who typically has 53 inch hips?

An overweight man who has 53 inch hips

People who have a lot of gluteofemoral fat are those who're most likely to have 53 inch hips. However, you might not have a 53 inch butt due to body fat alone. You could have wide hips and/or muscular glutes.

Of course, it's not possible to have 53 inch glutes purely due to lean mass; anyone with 53 in hips will naturally have a considerable amount of body fat as well.

That said, everyone stores fat in different places, with women generally tending to store more fat around their hips than around their waists. As such, you might need to lose quite a bit of total weight before you start to see significant decreases in your 53 inch hip size.

What size are 53 inch hips in clothing?

A chart showing what size 53 inch hips are in women's clothing

In women's clothing, 53 inch hips tend to be a size 3XL, which works out at a US size 22-24. Of course, sizes massively vary by brand, so it's always best to physically try on your clothes before buying them.

Why is having 53" hips bad for you?

An obese woman holding her chest

Having 53 inch hips is bad for you because it virtually guarantees that you also have a lot of stomach fat, which, in turn, likely means considerable amounts of visceral fat as well.

This is the dangerous kind of abdominal fat that wraps around your internal organs and leads to health problems like diabetes and heart disease.

To an extent—depending on your body weight—having 53" hips could also make it hard to exercise, which obviously makes losing weight harder as well.

So, while you shouldn't feel bad about yourself purely because you have a 53 inch butt, you also need to realize that you'll feel much better physically if you can slim your hips by losing weight.

In conclusion

An obese woman showing that she has 53 inch hips

Even though most people don't have 53 inch hips, there are plenty of people who do. After all, it's quite clear that, as a society, we're getting fatter and that our circumference measurements are becoming larger.

As mentioned, some individuals have a genetic predisposition to storing body fat around their hips. This can make it harder to shift your excess gluteofemoral fat initially, but as long as you're losing weight, you're on the path to better health.

Brianna Martin
Brianna Martin has worked in health and wellness media for more than 8 years. She uses her organisational skills and passion for fitness to organise our team of content creators. As a former track and field athlete, Bri still hits the gym hard 5 times a week to maintain her flexibility and athleticism.
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